see common things, like never before
see common things, like never before
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warpten:

Tom Ford
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moshita:

Codex Seraphinianus
The Codex is unlike other historically well-known strange books (such as the Voynich Manuscript), in that the author of the book is not only known (Luigi Serafini is his name), he’s still alive. But the book is just so damned strange that it has accumulated a veritable industry of speculation about its meaning, deeper origins, and whether the language in which it is written actually has any syntax or not. Serafini has said relatively little about it himself over the years, and denies that the script has any meaning, but no one really believes that.
Luigi Serafini
moshita:

Codex Seraphinianus
The Codex is unlike other historically well-known strange books (such as the Voynich Manuscript), in that the author of the book is not only known (Luigi Serafini is his name), he’s still alive. But the book is just so damned strange that it has accumulated a veritable industry of speculation about its meaning, deeper origins, and whether the language in which it is written actually has any syntax or not. Serafini has said relatively little about it himself over the years, and denies that the script has any meaning, but no one really believes that.
Luigi Serafini
moshita:

Codex Seraphinianus
The Codex is unlike other historically well-known strange books (such as the Voynich Manuscript), in that the author of the book is not only known (Luigi Serafini is his name), he’s still alive. But the book is just so damned strange that it has accumulated a veritable industry of speculation about its meaning, deeper origins, and whether the language in which it is written actually has any syntax or not. Serafini has said relatively little about it himself over the years, and denies that the script has any meaning, but no one really believes that.
Luigi Serafini
moshita:

Codex Seraphinianus
The Codex is unlike other historically well-known strange books (such as the Voynich Manuscript), in that the author of the book is not only known (Luigi Serafini is his name), he’s still alive. But the book is just so damned strange that it has accumulated a veritable industry of speculation about its meaning, deeper origins, and whether the language in which it is written actually has any syntax or not. Serafini has said relatively little about it himself over the years, and denies that the script has any meaning, but no one really believes that.
Luigi Serafini
moshita:

Codex Seraphinianus
The Codex is unlike other historically well-known strange books (such as the Voynich Manuscript), in that the author of the book is not only known (Luigi Serafini is his name), he’s still alive. But the book is just so damned strange that it has accumulated a veritable industry of speculation about its meaning, deeper origins, and whether the language in which it is written actually has any syntax or not. Serafini has said relatively little about it himself over the years, and denies that the script has any meaning, but no one really believes that.
Luigi Serafini
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nevver:

When did romance become uncool?
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Salvador Dali – Ménagère (Cutlery Set) 1957
Six pieces (silver-gilt) comprising of two forks, two knives and two enameled spoons.
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likeafieldmouse:

Rooms with a View 
“This exhibition focuses on a subject treasured by the Romantics: the view through an open window. German, French, Danish, and Russian artists first took up the theme in the second decade of the nineteenth century. 
Juxtaposing near and far, the window is a metaphor for unfulfilled longing. Painters distilled this feeling in pictures of hushed, spare rooms with contemplative figures; studios with artists at work; and open windows as the sole motif. As the exhibition reveals, these pictures may shift markedly in tone, yet they share a distinct absence of the anecdote and narrative that characterized earlier genre painting.”
1. Peter Ilsted
2. Carl Holsøe
3. Léon Cogniet
4. Wilhelm Bendz
5. Alfred Broge
6. Caspar David Friedrich
7. Georg Friedrich Kersting
8. Jacobus Vrel
9. Johann Erdmann Hummel
10. Vilhelm Hammershøi
likeafieldmouse:

Rooms with a View 
“This exhibition focuses on a subject treasured by the Romantics: the view through an open window. German, French, Danish, and Russian artists first took up the theme in the second decade of the nineteenth century. 
Juxtaposing near and far, the window is a metaphor for unfulfilled longing. Painters distilled this feeling in pictures of hushed, spare rooms with contemplative figures; studios with artists at work; and open windows as the sole motif. As the exhibition reveals, these pictures may shift markedly in tone, yet they share a distinct absence of the anecdote and narrative that characterized earlier genre painting.”
1. Peter Ilsted
2. Carl Holsøe
3. Léon Cogniet
4. Wilhelm Bendz
5. Alfred Broge
6. Caspar David Friedrich
7. Georg Friedrich Kersting
8. Jacobus Vrel
9. Johann Erdmann Hummel
10. Vilhelm Hammershøi
likeafieldmouse:

Rooms with a View 
“This exhibition focuses on a subject treasured by the Romantics: the view through an open window. German, French, Danish, and Russian artists first took up the theme in the second decade of the nineteenth century. 
Juxtaposing near and far, the window is a metaphor for unfulfilled longing. Painters distilled this feeling in pictures of hushed, spare rooms with contemplative figures; studios with artists at work; and open windows as the sole motif. As the exhibition reveals, these pictures may shift markedly in tone, yet they share a distinct absence of the anecdote and narrative that characterized earlier genre painting.”
1. Peter Ilsted
2. Carl Holsøe
3. Léon Cogniet
4. Wilhelm Bendz
5. Alfred Broge
6. Caspar David Friedrich
7. Georg Friedrich Kersting
8. Jacobus Vrel
9. Johann Erdmann Hummel
10. Vilhelm Hammershøi
likeafieldmouse:

Rooms with a View 
“This exhibition focuses on a subject treasured by the Romantics: the view through an open window. German, French, Danish, and Russian artists first took up the theme in the second decade of the nineteenth century. 
Juxtaposing near and far, the window is a metaphor for unfulfilled longing. Painters distilled this feeling in pictures of hushed, spare rooms with contemplative figures; studios with artists at work; and open windows as the sole motif. As the exhibition reveals, these pictures may shift markedly in tone, yet they share a distinct absence of the anecdote and narrative that characterized earlier genre painting.”
1. Peter Ilsted
2. Carl Holsøe
3. Léon Cogniet
4. Wilhelm Bendz
5. Alfred Broge
6. Caspar David Friedrich
7. Georg Friedrich Kersting
8. Jacobus Vrel
9. Johann Erdmann Hummel
10. Vilhelm Hammershøi
likeafieldmouse:

Rooms with a View 
“This exhibition focuses on a subject treasured by the Romantics: the view through an open window. German, French, Danish, and Russian artists first took up the theme in the second decade of the nineteenth century. 
Juxtaposing near and far, the window is a metaphor for unfulfilled longing. Painters distilled this feeling in pictures of hushed, spare rooms with contemplative figures; studios with artists at work; and open windows as the sole motif. As the exhibition reveals, these pictures may shift markedly in tone, yet they share a distinct absence of the anecdote and narrative that characterized earlier genre painting.”
1. Peter Ilsted
2. Carl Holsøe
3. Léon Cogniet
4. Wilhelm Bendz
5. Alfred Broge
6. Caspar David Friedrich
7. Georg Friedrich Kersting
8. Jacobus Vrel
9. Johann Erdmann Hummel
10. Vilhelm Hammershøi
likeafieldmouse:

Rooms with a View 
“This exhibition focuses on a subject treasured by the Romantics: the view through an open window. German, French, Danish, and Russian artists first took up the theme in the second decade of the nineteenth century. 
Juxtaposing near and far, the window is a metaphor for unfulfilled longing. Painters distilled this feeling in pictures of hushed, spare rooms with contemplative figures; studios with artists at work; and open windows as the sole motif. As the exhibition reveals, these pictures may shift markedly in tone, yet they share a distinct absence of the anecdote and narrative that characterized earlier genre painting.”
1. Peter Ilsted
2. Carl Holsøe
3. Léon Cogniet
4. Wilhelm Bendz
5. Alfred Broge
6. Caspar David Friedrich
7. Georg Friedrich Kersting
8. Jacobus Vrel
9. Johann Erdmann Hummel
10. Vilhelm Hammershøi
likeafieldmouse:

Rooms with a View 
“This exhibition focuses on a subject treasured by the Romantics: the view through an open window. German, French, Danish, and Russian artists first took up the theme in the second decade of the nineteenth century. 
Juxtaposing near and far, the window is a metaphor for unfulfilled longing. Painters distilled this feeling in pictures of hushed, spare rooms with contemplative figures; studios with artists at work; and open windows as the sole motif. As the exhibition reveals, these pictures may shift markedly in tone, yet they share a distinct absence of the anecdote and narrative that characterized earlier genre painting.”
1. Peter Ilsted
2. Carl Holsøe
3. Léon Cogniet
4. Wilhelm Bendz
5. Alfred Broge
6. Caspar David Friedrich
7. Georg Friedrich Kersting
8. Jacobus Vrel
9. Johann Erdmann Hummel
10. Vilhelm Hammershøi
likeafieldmouse:

Rooms with a View 
“This exhibition focuses on a subject treasured by the Romantics: the view through an open window. German, French, Danish, and Russian artists first took up the theme in the second decade of the nineteenth century. 
Juxtaposing near and far, the window is a metaphor for unfulfilled longing. Painters distilled this feeling in pictures of hushed, spare rooms with contemplative figures; studios with artists at work; and open windows as the sole motif. As the exhibition reveals, these pictures may shift markedly in tone, yet they share a distinct absence of the anecdote and narrative that characterized earlier genre painting.”
1. Peter Ilsted
2. Carl Holsøe
3. Léon Cogniet
4. Wilhelm Bendz
5. Alfred Broge
6. Caspar David Friedrich
7. Georg Friedrich Kersting
8. Jacobus Vrel
9. Johann Erdmann Hummel
10. Vilhelm Hammershøi
likeafieldmouse:

Rooms with a View 
“This exhibition focuses on a subject treasured by the Romantics: the view through an open window. German, French, Danish, and Russian artists first took up the theme in the second decade of the nineteenth century. 
Juxtaposing near and far, the window is a metaphor for unfulfilled longing. Painters distilled this feeling in pictures of hushed, spare rooms with contemplative figures; studios with artists at work; and open windows as the sole motif. As the exhibition reveals, these pictures may shift markedly in tone, yet they share a distinct absence of the anecdote and narrative that characterized earlier genre painting.”
1. Peter Ilsted
2. Carl Holsøe
3. Léon Cogniet
4. Wilhelm Bendz
5. Alfred Broge
6. Caspar David Friedrich
7. Georg Friedrich Kersting
8. Jacobus Vrel
9. Johann Erdmann Hummel
10. Vilhelm Hammershøi
likeafieldmouse:

Rooms with a View 
“This exhibition focuses on a subject treasured by the Romantics: the view through an open window. German, French, Danish, and Russian artists first took up the theme in the second decade of the nineteenth century. 
Juxtaposing near and far, the window is a metaphor for unfulfilled longing. Painters distilled this feeling in pictures of hushed, spare rooms with contemplative figures; studios with artists at work; and open windows as the sole motif. As the exhibition reveals, these pictures may shift markedly in tone, yet they share a distinct absence of the anecdote and narrative that characterized earlier genre painting.”
1. Peter Ilsted
2. Carl Holsøe
3. Léon Cogniet
4. Wilhelm Bendz
5. Alfred Broge
6. Caspar David Friedrich
7. Georg Friedrich Kersting
8. Jacobus Vrel
9. Johann Erdmann Hummel
10. Vilhelm Hammershøi
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visualgraphc:

Joanna Smithson: Peppermayo 
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srheannonteran:

archatlas:

Kailashnath Temple
“What’s most amazing about the Kailashnath Temple is that it’s carved out of one single rock. Carvers started at the top and excavated downward, exhuming the temple out of the existing rock. The traditional methods were rigidly followed by the master architect, which could not have been achieved by excavating from the front.” [via]

whoa
srheannonteran:

archatlas:

Kailashnath Temple
“What’s most amazing about the Kailashnath Temple is that it’s carved out of one single rock. Carvers started at the top and excavated downward, exhuming the temple out of the existing rock. The traditional methods were rigidly followed by the master architect, which could not have been achieved by excavating from the front.” [via]

whoa
srheannonteran:

archatlas:

Kailashnath Temple
“What’s most amazing about the Kailashnath Temple is that it’s carved out of one single rock. Carvers started at the top and excavated downward, exhuming the temple out of the existing rock. The traditional methods were rigidly followed by the master architect, which could not have been achieved by excavating from the front.” [via]

whoa
srheannonteran:

archatlas:

Kailashnath Temple
“What’s most amazing about the Kailashnath Temple is that it’s carved out of one single rock. Carvers started at the top and excavated downward, exhuming the temple out of the existing rock. The traditional methods were rigidly followed by the master architect, which could not have been achieved by excavating from the front.” [via]

whoa
srheannonteran:

archatlas:

Kailashnath Temple
“What’s most amazing about the Kailashnath Temple is that it’s carved out of one single rock. Carvers started at the top and excavated downward, exhuming the temple out of the existing rock. The traditional methods were rigidly followed by the master architect, which could not have been achieved by excavating from the front.” [via]

whoa
srheannonteran:

archatlas:

Kailashnath Temple
“What’s most amazing about the Kailashnath Temple is that it’s carved out of one single rock. Carvers started at the top and excavated downward, exhuming the temple out of the existing rock. The traditional methods were rigidly followed by the master architect, which could not have been achieved by excavating from the front.” [via]

whoa
srheannonteran:

archatlas:

Kailashnath Temple
“What’s most amazing about the Kailashnath Temple is that it’s carved out of one single rock. Carvers started at the top and excavated downward, exhuming the temple out of the existing rock. The traditional methods were rigidly followed by the master architect, which could not have been achieved by excavating from the front.” [via]

whoa
srheannonteran:

archatlas:

Kailashnath Temple
“What’s most amazing about the Kailashnath Temple is that it’s carved out of one single rock. Carvers started at the top and excavated downward, exhuming the temple out of the existing rock. The traditional methods were rigidly followed by the master architect, which could not have been achieved by excavating from the front.” [via]

whoa
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fasinfrankie:

Trainspotting (1996)
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mishawinsexster:

I guess in a way we all grew up to be Debbie.
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kushandwizdom:

Good Vibes HERE
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jockohomoremix:

Miguel Chevalier Spreads Magic Carpets 2014 Over Sacre Coeur in Morocco - “Magic Carpets 2014′ by French artist Miguel Chevalier is an interactive light display spread out across the floor of the former Sacré Coeur church in Casablanca, Morocco. Covering it with a huge layer of light, the work references the world of biology, microorganisms, and cellular automata – as cells have the ability to multiply in abundance, divide and merge at different paces. Pieces come together, fall apart and transform in shape at rapid speeds. The displayed organic universe mingles with a digital construction of overlapping pixels.”
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nevver:

Orwell manuscript
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medicalschool:

A child’s skull prior to loosing it’s baby teeth